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The Royal Commission began its planning at Yanbu with a thorough survey of the project site, which was located on a desert plain sandwiched between the Hejaz Mountains and the Red Sea. From the site’s inland boundary, a network of small water courses snake their way down to the sea.
The Yanbu site lacked everything required to support even a minimum level of human existence, let alone full-blown industrial development. Unlike Jubail, the site was far from the nearest metropolitan area and ready access to essential goods and services. The challenge, therefore was enormous, to provide power, water, roads, airport, industrial port, telephones, housing, schools, health care facilities and all other services and facilities required by a modern industrial city.
 
 

 

Power and Water
For the past two decades, Yanbu Industrial City has been a utility island, self-contained and unconnected to any regional power or water systems. That situation, however, has now changed, with the completion of two projects. A 380/kv electrical intertie has linked the Yanbu power system with the western region grid, while new potable water lines connect the industrial city with a nearby SWCC desalination plant and Yanbu Al-Bahr.
Besides being versatile, the power and water plant has certain design features, including multiple fuel use and alternative steam supplies that make it extremely reliable


 

 

TOTAL UNITS
TYPE
OUT-PUT (MW)
TOTAL
3
STG
120
360
9
GTG
60
540
 
Power Generation and Water Distribution:
Yanbu’s power needs are supplied by nine gas-turbine and three steam-turbine generators, all capable of burning either gas or fuel oil. Together, these  units can produce 900 MW of electricity.
Power at required voltages is supplied to various industries and the community thru six (115/13.8) kV substations.
 
 
Water Desalination and Distribution:
Also in the central utility complex, water from the red sea is fed to nine desalination units. These use heat recovered from the gas-turbine power generators to produce steam, which is then condensed into  fresh water. Additional steam can also be provided by steam turbines. The desalination units at Yanbu can produce over 95,000 cubic meters of fresh water daily. Some of this desalinated water is chlorinated and remineralized to become potable water. The rest, still chemically pure, is used for industrial processes. Water is distributed throughout the city to households, industrial users, and other facilities by means of several pumping stations and over about 510 Kilometers of underground piping.
 

 
TOTAL UNITS
CAPACITY (M3/DAY)
TYPE
6
9.120
MSF
3
13.680
MSF
TOTAL MYAS WATER NETWORK
510 km
 
Sea Water Cooling
Industries require huge amounts of water, no year-round natural source of freshwater is available, and the cost of producing desalinated water for cooling purposes would be prohibitive.
Roughly 60 percent of the seawater that passes through the pump station in Yanbu’s main power and water complex goes to supply process cooling water for industry. The balance is used by the plant’s steam-turbine generators and desalination units to produce power and water.
With the ability to pump 11.04 million cubic meters of water a day, the Yanbu facility is the largest pressurized cooling system in the world, yet its operation is uncomplicated.
Cool seawater enters the system at the main pumping station. Following filtration and chlorination, water flows to the industries through 27 Kilometers of underground piping. The industries return used seawater, via gravity mains, to an outfall channel that discharges into the
Red Sea five Kilometers Southeast of the intake channel.
To minimize adverse environmental effects, industries are not allowed to return water to the outfall channel that could jeopardize coral growth on the nearby barrier reef that protects part of the Yanbu’s port complex.
 
 
TOTAL PUMPS
CAPACITY- M3/HR
6
50.000
1
60.000
4
25.000
LENGTH OF SEAWATER NETWORK
37 km
 
Wastewater Treatment
The Royal Commission tries to maximize the use of desalinated water through the treatment and reuse of all wastewater.

Industrial effluents are collected and treated in a special system that has been installed as part of the infrastructure in Yanbu’s industrial parks. Following treatment, this wastewater is pumped back to the industrial areas for reuse.
Sanitary wastewater is collected from all over the city and treated similarly. The resultant high quality effluent is then reused as irrigation water.
Both industrial and sanitary wastewater treatment plants are located in a combined treatment facility adjacent to Yanbu’s power and water complex.

Other wastes are transported to Yanbu’s 440-hectare landfill, located in a far cover of the industrial area, where waste material is disposed of by type.
 
Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant
LENGTH OF COLLECTION SYSTEM
CAPACITY (M3/DAY)
TYPE TREATMENT
STORAGE TANKS
480KM
24.000
TERTIARY
2(12.000M3/EA)
 
 
Sanitary  Wastewater Treatment Plant
LENGTH OF COLLECTION SYSTEM
CAPACITY (M3/DAY)
TYPE TREATMENT
STORAGE TANKS
55KM
27.000
TERTIARY
4(20.000M3/EA)
 
Developed Land
Rough-grading was the first step required in the Yanbu construction program in order to provide level sites, control surface water runoff, and to improve soil structure for building and road foundations. Cut-and-fill operations and dredging have relocated over 70 million cubic meters of earth. In the process, the minimum land elevation within city boundaries has been raised to two meters.